A la une du Blog de l'histoire
Nous sommes actuellement le 25 Mai 2018 11:56

Le fuseau horaire est UTC+1 heure




Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 19 message(s) ]  Aller vers la page 1, 2  Suivant
Auteur Message
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 9:47 
Hors-ligne
Salluste
Salluste

Inscription : 15 Déc 2008 12:00
Message(s) : 266
une grande énigme en cours de résolution? l'armée perdue de Cambyse, d'après hérodote, 50000h perdus corps et biens dans le désert suite à une tempête de sable aurait été retrouvée. bien sûr sous réserve de confirmation mais les premiers artéfacts retrouvés semblenst convainquants

Tiré de discovery news, il y a aussi une vidéo et un diaporama
http://news.discovery.com/archaeology/c ... ahara.html

Vanished Persian Army Said Found in Desert
Bones, jewelry and weapons found in Egyptian desert may be the remains of Cambyses' army that vanished 2,500 years ago.

By Rossella Lorenzi | Sun Nov 08 2009 10:30 PM ET

Hundreds of bleached bones and skulls found in the desolate wilderness of the Sahara desert may be the remains of the long lost Cambyses' army, according to Italian researchers.
Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni
The remains of a mighty Persian army said to have drowned in the sands of the western Egyptian desert 2,500 years ago might have been finally located, solving one of archaeology's biggest outstanding mysteries, according to Italian researchers.
Bronze weapons, a silver bracelet, an earring and hundreds of human bones found in the vast desolate wilderness of the Sahara desert have raised hopes of finally finding the lost army of Persian King Cambyses II. The 50,000 warriors were said to be buried by a cataclysmic sandstorm in 525 B.C.
"We have found the first archaeological evidence of a story reported by the Greek historian Herodotus," Dario Del Bufalo, a member of the expedition from the University of Lecce, told Discovery News.
According to Herodotus (484-425 B.C.), Cambyses, the son of Cyrus the Great, sent 50,000 soldiers from Thebes to attack the Oasis of Siwa and destroy the oracle at the Temple of Amun after the priests there refused to legitimize his claim to Egypt.
After walking for seven days in the desert, the army got to an "oasis," which historians believe was El-Kharga. After they left, they were never seen again.
"A wind arose from the south, strong and deadly, bringing with it vast columns of whirling sand, which entirely covered up the troops and caused them wholly to disappear," wrote Herodotus.
A century after Herodotus wrote his account, Alexander the Great made his own pilgrimage to the oracle of Amun, and in 332 B.C. he won the oracle's confirmation that he was the divine son of Zeus, the Greek god equated with Amun.
The tale of Cambyses' lost army, however, faded into antiquity. As no trace of the hapless warriors was ever found, scholars began to dismiss the story as a fanciful tale.
Now, two top Italian archaeologists claim to have found striking evidence that the Persian army was indeed swallowed in a sandstorm. Twin brothers Angelo and Alfredo Castiglioni are already famous for their discovery 20 years ago of the ancient Egyptian "city of gold" Berenike Panchrysos.
Presented recently at the archaeological film festival of Rovereto, the discovery is the result of 13 years of research and five expeditions to the desert.
"It all started in 1996, during an expedition aimed at investigating the presence of iron meteorites near Bahrin, one small oasis not far from Siwa," Alfredo Castiglioni, director of the Eastern Desert Research Center (CeRDO)in Varese, told Discovery News.
While working in the area, the researchers noticed a half-buried pot and some human remains. Then the brothers spotted something really intriguing -- what could have been a natural shelter.
It was a rock about 35 meters (114.8 feet) long, 1.8 meters (5.9 feet) in height and 3 meters (9.8 feet) deep. Such natural formations occur in the desert, but this large rock was the only one in a large area.
"Its size and shape made it the perfect refuge in a sandstorm," Castiglioni said.
Right there, the metal detector of Egyptian geologist Aly Barakat of Cairo University located relics of ancient warfare: a bronze dagger and several arrow tips.
"We are talking of small items, but they are extremely important as they are the first Achaemenid objects, thus dating to Cambyses' time, which have emerged from the desert sands in a location quite close to Siwa," Castiglioni said.

About a quarter mile from the natural shelter, the Castiglioni team found a silver bracelet, an earring and few spheres which were likely part of a necklace.
"An analysis of the earring, based on photographs, indicate that it certainly dates to the Achaemenid period. Both the earring and the spheres appear to be made of silver. Indeed a very similar earring, dating to the fifth century B.C., has been found in a dig in Turkey," Andrea Cagnetti, a leading expert of ancient jewelry, told Discovery News.
In the following years, the Castiglioni brothers studied ancient maps and came to the conclusion that Cambyses' army did not take the widely believed caravan route via the Dakhla Oasis and Farafra Oasis.
"Since the 19th century, many archaeologists and explorers have searched for the lost army along that route. They found nothing. We hypothesized a different itinerary, coming from south. Indeed we found that such a route already existed in the 18th Dynasty," Castiglioni said.
According to Castiglioni, from El Kargha the army took a westerly route to Gilf El Kebir, passing through the Wadi Abd el Melik, then headed north toward Siwa.
"This route had the advantage of taking the enemy aback. Moreover, the army could march undisturbed. On the contrary, since the oasis on the other route were controlled by the Egyptians, the army would have had to fight at each oasis," Castiglioni said.
To test their hypothesis, the Castiglioni brothers did geological surveys along that alternative route. They found desiccated water sources and artificial wells made of hundreds of water pots buried in the sand. Such water sources could have made a march in the desert possible.
"Termoluminescence has dated the pottery to 2,500 years ago, which is in line with Cambyses' time," Castiglioni said.
In their last expedition in 2002, the Castiglioni brothers returned to the location of their initial discovery. Right there, some 100 km (62 miles) south of Siwa, ancient maps had erroneously located the temple of Amun.
The soldiers believed they had reached their destination, but instead they found the khamsin -- the hot, strong, unpredictable southeasterly wind that blows from the Sahara desert over Egypt.
"Some soldiers found refuge under that natural shelter, other dispersed in various directions. Some might have reached the lake of Sitra, thus surviving," Castiglioni said.
At the end of their expedition, the team decided to investigate Bedouin stories about thousands of white bones that would have emerged decades ago during particular wind conditions in a nearby area.
Indeed, they found a mass grave with hundreds of bleached bones and skulls.
"We learned that the remains had been exposed by tomb robbers and that a beautiful sword which was found among the bones was sold to American tourists," Castiglioni said.
Among the bones, a number of Persian arrow heads and a horse bit, identical to one appearing in a depiction of an ancient Persian horse, emerged.
"In the desolate wilderness of the desert, we have found the most precise location where the tragedy occurred," Del Bufalo said.
The team communicated their finding to the Geological Survey of Egypt and gave the recovered objects to the Egyptian authorities.
"We never heard back. I'm sure that the lost army is buried somewhere around the area we surveyed, perhaps under five meters (16.4 feet) of sand."
Piero Pruneti, editor of Archeologia Viva, Italy's most important archaeology magazine, is impressed by the team's work.
"Judging from their documentary, their hypothesis of an alternative route is very plausible," Prunetic told Discovery News. "Indeed, the Castiglioni's expeditions are all based on a careful study of the landscape...An in-depth exploration of the area is certainly needed!"


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 11:54 
Hors-ligne
Hérodote
Hérodote

Inscription : 10 Nov 2009 11:47
Message(s) : 11
Localisation : Paris/Rome
Personnellement, je crois que les frères Castiglioni ont encore fait une vraie découverte. Dommage que les autorités égyptiennes trainent des pieds pour organiser une vrai fouille du site, faudra attendre que le Dr. Hawass donne son aval. Pour les non-anglophones : un condensé de l'article de Rossella Lorenzi, avec lien vers le dossier sur Discovery.com. http://lebuzzdelamar.blogspot.com/2009/ ... ouvee.html


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 14:42 
Hors-ligne
Marc Bloch
Marc Bloch
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 15 Nov 2006 17:43
Message(s) : 4115
Localisation : Lorrain en exil à Paris
Oui, il aurait été bon sinon de traduire le papier en question, au moins d'en donner un résumé en français.

_________________
"[Il] conpissa tous mes louviaus"

"Les bijoux du tanuki se balancent
Pourtant il n'y a pas le moindre vent."


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 19:36 
Hors-ligne
Administrateur
Administrateur
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 09 Avr 2003 12:43
Message(s) : 2367
Localisation : Nantes
Je n'arrive pas à visionner la vidéo. Et vous ?

_________________
"Lisez, éclairez-vous, ce n'est que par la lecture qu'on fortifie son âme." - Voltaire
"Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriae, magistra vitae." De oratore - Cicéron


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 20:14 
Hors-ligne
Jules Michelet
Jules Michelet
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 29 Déc 2003 23:28
Message(s) : 3214
Ce serait une sacrée découverte en tout cas s'il elle était confirmée. A ma connaissance on n'a jamais découvert d'exemples archéologiques d'armées ou de caravanes mortes perdues dans le désert, je connais juste un cas de cargaison qu'une caravane aurait laissé de côté pour hâter sa route dans le Sahara (mais jamais récupérée, ce qui indiquerait que les hommes et bêtes se sont perdus). On sait en tout cas par les textes que ce genre de drames se produisait dans le Sahara, même pour des convois importants ; que ce soit arrivé aussi à une armée est possible. Mais c'était rare tout de même, vu que les convois militaires ou commerciaux utilisaient normalement des guides expérimentés. Cela ne suffisait cependant pas en cas de tempête de sable, accidents, attaques, qui pouvaient causer la perte d'une caravane entière ou d'une partie de celle-ci. Les victimes étaient cependant le plus souvent des groupes réduits et isolés, bien plus vulnérables. C'était peu courant à ce qu'il semble, vu qu'on avait l'habitude de voyager en grand nombre pour plus de sécurité.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 10 Nov 2009 20:15 
Hors-ligne
Salluste
Salluste

Inscription : 15 Déc 2008 12:00
Message(s) : 266
ce matin je l'ai vue sans problème sur le site mentionné


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 11 Nov 2009 7:37 
Hors-ligne
Administrateur
Administrateur
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 09 Avr 2003 12:43
Message(s) : 2367
Localisation : Nantes
J'ai réussi à la voir. Je reste sceptique. On nous parle d'une vallée entière recouverte d'ossements mais c'est toujours le même plan serré qu'on voit. Les quelques artéfacts que l'on nous montre suffisent-t-ils à identifier des soldats perses ? C'est un peu le problème avec Discovery Channel, ils s'emballent toujours un peu vite.

_________________
"Lisez, éclairez-vous, ce n'est que par la lecture qu'on fortifie son âme." - Voltaire
"Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriae, magistra vitae." De oratore - Cicéron


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 13 Nov 2009 15:33 
Hors-ligne
Plutarque
Plutarque
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 14 Oct 2005 13:47
Message(s) : 157
Salut,

Clio a raison, on n'aperçoit que peu d'ossements. Et s'ils sont si blanc, cela signifie qu'ils sont déjà exposés au soleil depuis pas mal de temps donc bonjour le pillage !

Zunkir, peux tu m'en dire d'avantage sur le chargement découvert dans le Sahara ?
Xuanzang à également écrit qu'en traversant le Turkestan, il a rencontré les ossements blanchis des caravanes qui se sont perdues sur la route de la soie.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 15 Nov 2009 21:14 
Hors-ligne
Jules Michelet
Jules Michelet
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 29 Déc 2003 23:28
Message(s) : 3214
Sargon d'Akkad a écrit :
Zunkir, peux tu m'en dire d'avantage sur le chargement découvert dans le Sahara ?


Après de maigre recherches à partir d'un livre de synthèse qui laissait entendre qu'il y aurait mieux à trouver, je n'ai pu mettre la main que sur un rapport de Th. Monod mentionnant une trouvaille non localisée qui permet d'identifier la date du chargement. Apparemment on n'a rien trouvé de mieux depuis. C'est à la première page, avec bibliographie :

http://www.mr.refer.org/numweb/IMG/pdf/n04_Monod-3.pdf

Comme quoi le désert est bien avare de ce genre de "cadeaux" archéologiques ...


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 20 Juin 2014 17:19 
Hors-ligne
Eginhard
Eginhard

Inscription : 18 Fév 2010 22:31
Message(s) : 844
Une autre explication ? :

Science Daily : Egyptologist unravels ancient mystery


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 20 Juin 2014 22:18 
Hors-ligne
Plutarque
Plutarque

Inscription : 12 Mai 2014 20:53
Message(s) : 158
Fabuleux! Je n'étais pas au courant de cette découverte.

Je comprends maintenant pourquoi Alexandre tenait tant à se faire sacrer roi d'Egypte à Siwah...
Après la tempête de sable le crédit du temple de Siwah a dû exploser!


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 21 Juin 2014 6:34 
Hors-ligne
Jean Mabillon
Jean Mabillon

Inscription : 22 Août 2008 14:17
Message(s) : 2589
C'est un info vieille 5 ans et elle n'a pas eu de suites...

_________________
"L'histoire serait une chose merveilleuse si seulement elle était vraie."
Léon Tolstoï.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 21 Juin 2014 10:46 
Hors-ligne
Eginhard
Eginhard

Inscription : 18 Fév 2010 22:31
Message(s) : 844
jibe a écrit :
C'est un info vieille 5 ans et elle n'a pas eu de suites...

4 ans avant la découverte de Kaper ?


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 21 Juin 2014 11:00 
Hors-ligne
Jean Mabillon
Jean Mabillon

Inscription : 22 Août 2008 14:17
Message(s) : 2589
Voici un article du 27 novembre 2009 expliquant que c'est une vieille mystification qui resurgit périodiquement (désolé c'est en anglais) :
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gary-s-chafetz/the-lost-armyfound-at-las_b_372293.html

_________________
"L'histoire serait une chose merveilleuse si seulement elle était vraie."
Léon Tolstoï.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Message Publié : 21 Juin 2014 11:27 
Hors-ligne
Eginhard
Eginhard

Inscription : 18 Fév 2010 22:31
Message(s) : 844
jibe a écrit :
Voici un article du 27 novembre 2009 expliquant que c'est une vieille mystification qui resurgit périodiquement (désolé c'est en anglais) :
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gary-s-chafetz/the-lost-armyfound-at-las_b_372293.html
Cet article est relatif à la découverte des frères Castiglioni de 2009.
L'info de ces jours-ci, relayée par plusieurs magazines, dont celui de ScienceDaily donné en lien précédemment, donne une autre explication (qu'elle soit vraie ou non).


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Afficher les messages publiés depuis :  Trier par  
Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 19 message(s) ]  Aller vers la page 1, 2  Suivant

Le fuseau horaire est UTC+1 heure


Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 2 invité(s)


Vous ne pouvez pas publier de nouveaux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas insérer de pièces jointes dans ce forum

Recherche de :
Aller vers :  





Propulsé par phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Traduction et support en françaisHébergement phpBB